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Farming

Investment in Welsh Lamb vital

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WELSH LAMB has a “fantastic name” all over the world but it was vital it received continued investment post-Brexit to differentiate it from keen competitors in the global marketplace, former Waitrose chief Lord Mark Price told farming industry leaders at Hybu Cig Cymru-Meat Promotion Wales’ (HCC) annual conference.
“Everything that we have become used to is about to change,” he said. “I would suggest there is no time to waste in developing a new, globally-minded approach and prepare to become match fit to win in a new global game.
“Your competitor is no longer the farm next door or even the neighbouring county- it will be Mexico, Argentina, New Zealand or Australia. In the future, the UK doesn’t have to just compete against the other 27 EU countries but instead will have truly global competition- and opportunity.”
Lord Price, a former Minister of State for Trade and Investment, and then Trade Policy, said differentiation was vital for Welsh Lamb, “Why is your product better than one from Ireland or New Zealand? Welsh Lamb has a fantastic name all over the world- but you still have to invest in that.”
He felt in the future the UK Food Service industry offered a fantastic opportunity for market growth for Welsh Lamb and Welsh Beef. “It’s around 35 per cent of the market here but in the US it’s 50 per cent and there’s only one way of travel so it’s a going to be a great opportunity.”
Lord Price was Managing Director of Waitrose from 2007-16. In his view, there were three potential European Union trade deal options for the UK post Brexit: No deal, a form of customs union and a free trade agreement. “I believe the third is the most likely long-term outcome. The UK strikes a comprehensive free trade agreement with the EU and, in doing so, is free to strike other advantageous trade deals.
“Such a deal would be based on zero tariffs and regulatory alignment in areas where it made sense to do so- say pharmaceuticals or automotive, where frictionless trade is key- and in Food and Drink, given the importance of our relationship with Ireland.
“If there are tariff and regulatory alignment with technology to track goods, this could provide the components for having, as near as possible, frictionless trade- all of which suggests the UK can strike mutually beneficial trade deals internationally, reducing the cost of goods to British consumers,” he reasoned.
Regarding public concerns over the possibility of new trade deals enabling food imports such as chlorinated chicken, Lord Price said he felt the Department of Trade would ensure it operated strictly in line with established food policies as positioned by Defra on a wide range of matters including standards, labelling, welfare and packaging.
He said environmental concerns were moving up the political and consumer agenda. “I’ll leave for now the issue of how subsidies might swing to reward sustainable behaviour- but I would just like to remind you that it was more than a decade ago that Walker’s started to label carbon content on crisp packets.
“The scheme did not take off but I suspect supermarkets responding to consumers will move again towards measuring carbon impacts of their products and the Government will see this as an “oven-ready” popular tax.
“Red meat, I suspect, will face a challenge- which, from what I have heard from HCC and others today, you will be well prepared for,” said Lord Price.
In encouraging news for Welsh Lamb farmers, NFU Cymru has welcomed Waitrose & Partners plans to source all of its own-label fresh and frozen lamb from Welsh and British lamb producers 365 days a year from June 2021.
NFU Cymru Livestock Board Chairman Wyn Evans said: “We thoroughly welcome Waitrose’s commitment to stock 100% Welsh and British lamb from 2021. This comes at a time of great uncertainty for the sheep sector, so today’s news that Waitrose will be moving to a year-round supply of Farm Assured quality Welsh and British lamb is a welcome boost.
“This is a really positive move from one of the major buyers of lamb in the UK which highlights that there is a strong appetite amongst consumers for Welsh and British lamb products. We look forward to working in partnership with Waitrose to help further grow sales of great-tasting Welsh lamb.”

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Farming

NFU wants increased use of wool in buildings

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Wool insulation: Could be used as part of insulation grant schemes going forward in Wales

NFU CYMRU has written to Welsh Government calling for the introduction of new measures to increase the use of British wool in homes and public buildings.
In a letter to the Minister for Housing and Local Government, Julie James MS, NFU Cymru Livestock Board Chair Wyn Evans has called on Welsh Government to support Welsh farmers by specifying wool rich carpets and other interior fabrics in all government and local authority buildings. The letter also advocates for wool insulation to be used as part of insulation grant schemes going forward in Wales on existing properties and new builds.

The letter follows a summer in which sheep farmers have seen the price they receive for their wool clip collapse as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on the worldwide market for wool. The situation has sparked a petition, which NFU Cymru is supporting, which calls on the UK Government and each of the devolved governments to make the use of wool mandatory in new home insulations schemes and for insulation and carpeting in public buildings in each of their respective nations.
In his letter, Mr Evans said: “You may be aware of the current crisis the British Wool Marketing Board is facing because of the worldwide Covid-19 pandemic. This is severely affecting wool prices, demand and the ability to trade this totally natural, environmentally friendly product. Wales has approaching five million breeding sheep, for animal welfare purposes sheep must be shorn annually. The crisis in wool markets means the price that farmers receive for their wool is only a fraction of their shearing costs, the crisis is therefore impacting right down to primary producers of wool and the rural economy.

“We believe there are opportunities to increase demand through the domestic market here in Wales. Welsh Government could play a significant role in doing just this whilst meeting commitments to protect and enhance the environment for future generations.

“Wool is a versatile, sustainable product and a fantastic, natural insulator that can help drive improvements in the energy efficiency of new and existing homes. We believe its use could be stimulated through grant aid on its environmental benefits. In our view this would be an be an economic and environmental win.”

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Farming

Devolution must be respected

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IN RESPONSE to a UK Government white paper on internal markets, the Farmers’ Union of Wales has stressed the importance of protecting Welsh farmers against unfair competition from other parts of the UK and countries across the globe, and that Welsh devolution must be respected.

In his introduction to the UK Internal Market White Paper, Alok Sharma MP, Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, highlights how increasing differences between rules and standards applied by different Governments in the UK’s four nations after Brexit could cause market distortion, discrimination and unfair competition for businesses in a way not seen for hundreds of years.

The White Paper, therefore, proposes measures to prevent such impacts based on the principles of ‘non-discrimination’ and ‘mutual recognition’

FUW Head of Policy, Dr Nick Fenwick said: “We are glad the UK Government has woken up to the need to take this issue seriously as it has previously been kicked into the long grass because it is so politically contentious.”
Dr Fenwick said that the FUW had been highlighting the need to address this issue since the EU Referendum in 2016, and in July 2018 the FUW had published a detailed paper considering the matter entitled ‘Filling the Void – Steps towards a post-Brexit UK policy framework’.

“While we welcome the UK Government’s recognition of this issue, we are extremely concerned at the suggestion that rules could simply be dictated by London, rather than there being a means by which to reach agreement between UK Governments.”

Dr Fenwick said such a move could undermine devolution and work to the disadvantage of Welsh farmers.
“The consideration of such matters in a White Paper within months of the end of the Withdrawal Agreement period gives us very little time to hold proper detailed discussions and introduce the type of structures and bodies we truly need to make recommendations, enforce regulations, arbitrate on matters etc. in a way that is fair.”
“It also gives us very little time to sort out what are huge constitutional issues which also happen to be crucial to the running of Welsh businesses,” he added.

In response to the White Paper, the Union further stressed that while the UK Government is right to recognise the dangers of direct and indirect discrimination, unfair competition, market distortion and other issues that could arise within the GB/UK internal market, it should also recognise that the same issue exists across international borders.

“Given the current trade negotiations with the EU and USA, for example, the UK Government should also recognise the likelihood of such adverse impacts occurring as a result of inappropriate or ill-considered trade deals which expose us to different standards or unfair competition,” said Dr Fenwick.

“This is a particular concern with regard to agricultural produce produced to environmental, health and welfare, social and other standards that do not meet those required of UK producers, and subsidy and support regimes that differ significantly to those introduced in future in the UK’s four nations.”

At present, while significant differences between the UK and the EU is allowed under Single Market, Common Agricultural Policy and related rules, these are within strict boundaries aimed at minimising market distortion and unfair competition while recognising regional and national needs.

If a trade deal with the EU is reached, there is potential for market distortion and unfair competition for UK producers as a result of the fact that the EU will continue to pay farmers direct support, but Wales and England want to move over to environmental ‘public goods’ style payments – with many lobbying for farm payments to be cut altogether.

“The EU’s reaffirmed commitment to maintaining direct support for active farmers through CAP payments, coupled with a move in Wales and other parts of the UK to get rid of direct farm support in favour of environmental payments, would clearly introduce the kind of unfair competition the UK Government refers to in this paper.
“This danger is no different in principle to the dangers recognised in the Internal Markets White Paper, so also should be recognised by our Governments – not only in the context of unfair competition from the EU, our most important trading partner in terms of food, but also countries like the USA if we are to strike a deal with them.
“We need a trade deal with the EU to avoid massive damage to farms and other businesses, but we also need our governments to recognise the self inflicted damage that could be done by radically changing our own farm support systems while our main competitors twenty or thirty miles away over the sea continue with direct farm support,” he added.

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Farming

Farming Connect’s face-to-face training back on

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DUE to the restrictions of Covid 19, although it’s not ‘training as usual’ as yet for Farming Connect, face-to-face training courses held exclusively outdoors can now resume immediately. This means that provided the Welsh Government’s current Covid 19 regulations are met and every individual involved stays two metres apart, face-to-face training is available.
Training can also be carried out in large, open sheds, barns or outbuildings, where the two metre distance rule and other Covid 19 regulations can be adhered to. Welsh Government has warned that its guidance is subject to change should there be a resurgence of the pandemic.  It is hoped that a full resumption of Farming Connect’s indoor classroom-based training will be possible in the autumn.

Kevin Thomas, director of Lantra Wales, which together with Menter a Busnes delivers Farming Connect on behalf of the Welsh Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, welcomed the announcement.
“With all Farming Connect face to face training either fully funded or subsidised by up to 80%, it is very good news for the industry that so many face-to-face courses are now available again.

“Personal, business and technical development is critical as farmers and foresters prepare for a future outside the EU and with over 80 subjects to choose from, this could be the ideal time to learn something new or expand your knowledge on a specific subject.

“New skills will also be especially beneficial for those who have had to adapt their business model due to the changed market conditions caused by the pandemic,” said Mr. Thomas, who added that all Farming Connect training completed will be added to each trainee’s online ‘Storfa Sgiliau’ professional development records.
Registered individuals who received an approval for face-to-face training but whose courses were postponed due to the pandemic lockdown, should contact their selected training provider as soon as possible to discuss their options. Those who have not already applied for funded training can do so within the next skills application window which will be open from 09:00 on Monday 7 September until 17:00 on Friday 30 October 2020.

Farming Connect’s range of subsidised digital or ‘remote’ training has steadily increased since the pandemic first surfaced, and is now available for a number of Farming Connect courses including food safety; business-related training, poultry related training and animal health and welfare topics.

Training options within Farming Connect’s fully funded ICT and animal health training programmes can all be provided remotely, either one-to-one or via for example, a ‘virtual’ group animal health workshop. In addition, Farming Connect’s range of fully funded e-learning interactive modules has recently been refreshed and expanded to deliver more topics.
For further information about Farming Connect’s skills and lifelong learning programme, either contact your local development officer or your selected training provider. Visit www.gov.wales/farmingconnect for further information, a list of all training providers and the courses currently available.

Farming Connect, which is delivered by Menter a Busnes and Lantra, has received funding through the Welsh Government Rural Communities – Rural Development Programme 2014-2020, which is funded by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the Welsh Government.

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