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Specialist engineering business achieves record success

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A Welsh engineering business that supplied parts that helped keep the RAF’s Spitfires flying during World War 2 has achieved record-breaking export sales after expanding into new international markets.

Llanelli-based Teddington Engineered Solutions has seen its turnover grow by 18% in the last two years, largely thanks to export sales which made up 66% of the firm’s total sales in the last financial year.

Established in the 1920s, Teddington designs and manufactures expansion joints for a range of industries including aerospace, marine, nuclear power and defence. The joints compensate movement in pipe work caused by temperature change, pressure or vibration.

The company has exported its products to more than 90 countries since 2003, with China, the Middle East and Europe being among its largest markets.

Now for the first time it has entered a developing sector within the steel industry – manufacturing expansion joints for use within direct reduced iron steel plants. Direct iron reduction allows steel to be made more cheaply as it removes the need for conventional blast furnaces, instead using alternatives such as electric arc furnaces.

Jason Thomas, Commercial Director at Teddington Engineered Solutions said: “Our order book has increased significantly over the last two years, so much so that it reached a record high recently. It’s all down to exports and securing contracts with new clients.

“We’ve been trying for many years to get into this specialised steel making industry so doing so is a real breakthrough for us. We’ve already supplied three contracts since April last year and have been assured that we are the preferred bidder for future contracts.

Originally specialising in solutions for the aircraft industry, the years after World War 2 saw Teddington diversify into new sectors such as the petrochemical industry, with the firm selling its expansion joints all over the world.

Key to the company’s export growth, Teddington has received a range of support from Welsh Government export specialists including help with trade missions, exhibitions and identifying trade opportunities, as well as general export advice.
The company’s firm focus on international trade has resulted in a nearly 30% increase in staff over the past four years with Teddington now becoming one of the largest employers in the area.

China is one of the firm’s largest markets. Teddington was the first company to supply bellows for the LNG tankers that are currently being built in China and is also a leading supplier for the nuclear industry in the country. It is now looking to secure similar work elsewhere.

Speaking about the company’s international success Mr Thomas added: “We buck the trend compared to a lot of UK companies which import their product from China. Instead, we export into China. It’s a specialised product and in many industries, our engineering experience along with a reliable, quality product makes choosing Teddington an easy choice.

“The same goes for the Middle East, there are no reputable manufacturers of our product in the area. So the need for overseas expertise is required to resolve issues, design and manufacture solutions.”

In the Middle East, Teddington has been involved in some very prestigious projects. In Dubai alone, it has supplied Dubai airport, the metro system, the world’s tallest building the Burj Khalifa, the biggest mall in the world and the Palm Jumeirah.

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Carmarthen: Police appeal following death of 31-year-old Harry Lloyd

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THE INVESTIGATION is continuing into the death of 31-year-old Harry Lloyd who had suffered serious injuries at Francis Terrace, Carmarthen and later died at hospital.

There is still a police presence at the property and enquiries being made in the local area.

We were called to an incident at an address in Francis Terrace, Carmarthen at around 9.50am on Wednesday, February 20.

Enquiries are on-going to establish the cause of death.

A 28-year-old-woman arrested on suspicion of GBH remains in police custody.

Here’s a tribute from Harry’s family: “We are absolutely devastated by the loss of our son, brother, nephew, cousin and friend.

“Harry was a very popular, beautiful, gentle soul who will be missed.

“Please allow us to grieve this terrible loss in private.”

The police have asked that anyone with information that can help officers with their investigation is asked to report it by phoning 101. If you are deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired text the non-emergency number: 07811 311 908. Use reference: DP-20190220-098

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Care home told staff not to speak Welsh

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THERE is an investigation taking place after it was revealed that a care home had warned members of staff about speaking Welsh.

Isfryn in Ystradgynlais has Approved Headway Provider status and provides rehabilitation and support for individuals with an acquired brain injury. It has been revealed that staff were told that it would be unacceptable if clients heard employees conversing in a language they did not understand. The Accomplish Group, which runs Isfryn, has announced that it was reviewing the issue.

The Welsh Language Commissioner, Meri Huws said: “If two or more people wish to speak or write to each other in Welsh in Wales, they have the freedom to do so, in accordance with the Welsh Language (Wales) Measure 2011.

“If someone, such as an employer, tells them that that they should not continue to use the Welsh language, they are possibly interfering with that freedom. The Welsh Language Measure gives me as Commissioner statutory powers to investigate such cases.

“From the evidence I have seen today, it appears there may be an interference with staff’s freedom to use Welsh at Isfryn, Accomplish. I will be contacting the organisation to gather more information in order to understand the situation fully. I would also like to encourage anyone affected to get in touch with my office to enable us to investigate the matter fully.”

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Plans to partially re-open Cwmduad road following landslide

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CARMARTHENSHIRE County Council’s highways team hopes to partially re-open the A484 at Cwmduad in March, following extensive work to clear and make the area safe after a landslide.

The council has been leading a highly complex operation to clear the highway and stabilise the land since October, when the landslide tragically claimed the life of a young man.

Works are progressing well, and providing things continue to go to plan, the council hopes to re-open a single lane on March 18.

To date, the operation has involved extensive clearance and reinstatement of land off the highway, with the creation of a 10 metre buffer zone; construction of a ramp from the highway to the river, to aid the recovery of lorry that was swept in with the force of the landslide; and clearance of silt from the highway.

Work currently underway includes the construction of highway support and reinstatement of the bank to the east of the highway, as well as highway drainage clearance and reinstatement.

The final stage of works – which will take place alongside the single carriageway opening – will involve rebuilding a parapet wall alongside the highway, before the road can be fully re-opened.

Ruth Mullen, Director of Environment for Carmarthenshire County Council, said: “We are pleased that works have progressed well, and we can now plan for the partial re-opening of the road.

“We are grateful for the support from the community during a prolonged and difficult period. It has been a complex project and we have continued to be mindful of the sensitivities both locally and within the community where one person tragically lost their life.

“Whilst we have worked at pace to enable the highway to be reopened as quickly as possible, the safety of the public has always been our primary focus.”

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