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Chris Coleman receives UWTSD honour

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Chris Coleman: Praised Wales’ ‘contintent-sized’ passion

WALES’ football team Manager, Chris Coleman has been awarded an Honorary Fellowship by the University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD) during the first of its Swansea graduation ceremonies in the city’s Brangwyn Hall.

Born and brought up in Swansea, Chris Coleman enjoyed a career as a professional footballer before becoming Wales Manager in January 2012.

Without doubt, the highlight of his career has been leading Wales to a first major tournament since 1958. Whilst on the way to qualifying for UEFA EURO 2016, Chris also steered Wales to their highest ever FIFA World Ranking position of 8th.

Chris Coleman was presented today by Ceredig Emanuel, Head of the University’s School of Sport, Health and Outdoor Education, who said: “It is difficult not to overestimate the effect the Welsh football team’s performance had on our nation. It has enriched our sporting and cultural life and will always be there as a landmark and iconic moment in our history. This performance was no accident. It was masterminded by Chris Coleman – a manager who is able unify a squad of disparate players into a pattern of play that exemplified the best of each of them, with a real sense of purpose and direction. To achieve this at international level when there is infrequent contact with players is an outstanding achievement.

On receiving the award, Chris Coleman said: “I’m absolutely ecstatic, I never thought I’d stand here today and receive something like this.

“I’ve failed as many times as I’ve achieved but it’s not about that, it’s about self-belief and perseverance. You’ll have so many doubters along the way – if you haven’t got belief in yourself you don’t go a long way. If you haven’t got perseverance, your talent doesn’t get you through. If you think you can’t, you won’t.

“Everything I’ve ever achieved, I’ve had good people around me. We’ve got a good saying, I can’t but we can. Make sure the ‘we’ are the people you want around you.

“With us, I’m the front man, I’m the one who speaks to the media; I pick the team and make the big decisions but I’ve got a team of people around me to help me with almost everything so I have to delegate well and listen to the good advice. Surround yourself with good people. Never be in a comfort zone or you won’t achieve anything.

“I’m not telling you this because I read it in a book; because I saw it on TV or because someone told me. I’m telling you because it’s my experience.”

During EURO 2016, Chris was famously quoted as saying: “Dream – don’t be afraid to have dreams. Because four years ago I was as far away from this as you can imagine and look what’s happened.

With this mantra, Chris reached the pinnacle of his football career at EURO 2016, as he guided Wales to the Semi- Finals of a major tournament for the very first time. It was an incredible achievement that inspired a nation. An achievement that went beyond football and beyond sport. It was of cultural importance.

During his playing career, Chris ran out for Swansea City, Crystal Palace, Blackburn Rovers and Fulham. He was capped 32 times for Wales and scored 4 goals.

After injury ended his playing career at the age of 32, he became the youngest ever manager in the English Premier League at Fulham, guiding them to 9th position following his first full season in charge.

His managerial career also took him to Real Sociedad, Coventry City and Greek outfit Larissa, before taking on his dream job as Wales manager.

Chris enjoys a special relationship with Welsh fans as he regularly travels around the country, outside of the media spotlight, to hold intimate Q&A sessions in the heart of Welsh communities. It is, therefore, no wonder the country has shown him and his team such incredible support – the kind of support that led Chris to say: “As a nation geographically we’re small, but I think if you’re judging us on passion then we could be described as a continent.”

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Wales leads the way at WorldSkills UK

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Julie James AM: Wales the top region for entries

THE BEST of Wales’ vocational skills and talent will be taking to a national stage next month after Wales secured the highest number of entrants of all UK regions to the WorldSkills UK finals.

The WorldSkills UK finals will take place at Birmingham’s NEC between 16 and 18 November as part of the NEC’s annual Skills Show, the largest skills and careers event in the UK.

The competition is used to benchmark excellence across a range of vocational skills areas. It is also used as part of the selection process for WorldSkills, a global competition held every two years where the UK regions compete as one team. These finals are part of the selection process for WorldSkills 2019, which is being held in Kazan.

A total of 462 competitors are taking part in the WorldSkills UK finals, which consists of up to 60 national competitions where entrants battle it out for Gold, Silver and Bronze award recognition. Of that figure, 74 competitors are Welsh, which is 16% of the UK total and by far the highest regional representation.

In addition to the 74 Welsh finalists taking part in the national competitions, a further nineteen entrants will be representing Wales at the Skills Show in other competitions, bringing Wales’ overall number of entrants to this year’s Skills Show to 93.

The additional competitors are the ‘Kazan cohort’; nine talented students who have already met the qualifying criteria for Kazan 2019 so will now be competing to for a place on WorldSkills’ Team UK. Ten entrants are also taking part in the ‘Inclusive Skills’ competitions, which have been specifically designed for those with disabilities.

Welcoming the news, Skills and Science Minster Julie James said: “That Wales has been recognised as the top region for entries in the whole of the UK is a reflection of our skills excellence and the huge collaborative effort from partners that we have here in Wales.

“Through Skills Competitions we are creating a highly skilled nation that will support our economy, safeguard our industries and improve the prospects of Wales.

“I wish everyone taking part in next month’s competitions the very best of luck and would like to thank those who have supported them on their journey for all their hard work and dedication to help make this happen.”

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Education

Lenin on sale again

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Speaking on Revolutionary Art: Rob Phillips

THE UNIVERSITY OF WALES TRINITY SAINT DAVID was pleased to welcome Rob Phillips from The National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth to open an exhibition that will kick start a month long commemoration of the centenary of the Russian Revolution.

The programme of events is called ‘Lenin’s On Sale Again: 100 Years of the Russian Revolution’, and will be held at the university’s Lampeter campus from the start of the new term in September and throughout October. It will include a series of exhibitions, workshops and lectures that examine the effects of the Russian Revolution. The commemoration is the one of a series of cultural events taking place across Wales that mark the centenary.

The university’s Lampeter library is hosting two exhibitions which will be open to the public until 27th October. ‘The Revolutionary Art of Dmitry Moor’ will feature the work of the revolutionary artist who produced Soviet propaganda posters from 1918 until the Second World War. The university has also collaborated with The National Library of Wales and the Cymru1914 project to produce ‘News from Russia 1917,’ an exhibition of front pages from Swansea’s ‘Cambria Daily Leader’ showing how news from Russia was reported in west Wales and how it sat alongside war reporting and contemporary local events.

Dr Alex Scott, Lecturer in Modern History, said: “The Russian Revolution is one of the most important events in modern history. The revolution profoundly shaped the remainder of the twentieth century, establishing the geopolitical tensions between ‘East and West’ which resulted in the Cold War. But its importance far transcends politics and diplomacy. The aim of Lenin’s On Sale Again is to explore the widespread influence that the Russian Revolution had across the globe, and in a variety of fields. The programme of events will discuss different responses to the revolution from West Wales to China and beyond, while also examining its impact on art, cinema and literature – as well as academic disciplines such as Classics. The overarching goal is to demonstrate that the revolution was not just ten days that shook the world in 1917; but rather that it created far-reaching ramifications which can still be felt today – sometimes in quite unexpected ways.”

Rob Phillips, Welsh Political Archive at The National Library of Wales said: “We’re delighted to have been able to contribute to this exhibition; exhibitions like this are yet another way of opening up our collections to as wide an audience as possible. Copies of the Cambria Daily Leader show how the dramatic events in Russia, which had an enormous effect in Wales, were first reported here. The sense of confusion and concern over the implications of the news is clear and with good reason; the records of individuals and organisations held at the National Library show how that news affected political discourse for decades.”

The programme of events has been organised by Andy Bevan, Lecturer in International Development, and Dr Alex Scott, Lecturer in Modern History. Further details are available on the university’s website.

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Education

University hosts second David Trotter memorial lecture

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Philip Durkin: Delivering a lecture at Aberystwyth University

​THE DEPUTY Chief Editor of the Oxford English Dictionary will deliver the second David Trotter Memorial Lecture at Aberystwyth University ​next Friday ​(Oct ​20​).

Dr Philip Durkin will lecture on ‘Minding the gap: what we can learn from gaps in the surviving records for Middle English and Anglo-Norman’.

Hosted by the Department of Modern Languages, the lecture takes place at the Seddon Room in the Old College and starts at 6pm, with a drinks reception from 5.15pm. All are welcome to attend.

Amongst his many areas of expertise, Dr Durkin lists etymology, history of the English language – especially lexis, loanwords in English, language contact, medieval multilingualism, historical lexicography, and approaches to lexicography.

His 2014 volume Borrowed Words: A History of Loanwords in English, published by Oxford University Press, traces the history of loanwords in English from the earliest times to the present day.

Professor Wini Davies, Head of the Department of Modern Languages, said: “We are delighted to be able to welcome Dr Philip Durkin to give the second David Trotter Memorial Lecture and to hear him speak on a subject that was very important to David himself. David was an eminent lexicographer and chief editor of the Anglo-Norman Dictionary (AND), based at Aberystwyth, until his death in 2015.

“The AND, which recently received another tranche of funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council under the leadership of Dr Geert De Wilde and Dr Heather Pagan, makes an important contribution to the history of English as well as the history of French and has provided much data for the Oxford English Dictionary. It is therefore entirely fitting that the lecture by Dr Durkin will discuss links between these two varieties.”

Professor David Trotter was a leading international authority on French language and lexicography and head of the Department of Modern Languages at Aberystwyth University.

A former president of the Société de Linguistique Romane (2013-15) and a corresponding member of the Paris-based Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, Professor Trotter was a recipient of the Prix Honoré Chavée and a fellow of the Learned Society of Wales.

He was a graduate of Queen’s College Oxford and was appointed chair of French at Aberystwyth in 1993.

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